Vested Business Brokers

Hiring the expertise of a vested business broker is a good strategy, especially when doing business. If you are thinking of buying or selling your business, the foremost thought on your mind is, of course, how you will be able to optimize your sale or purchase. Getting the services of a reliable and knowledgeable vested business broker can make a huge difference.

Vested business brokers act as the middlemen between buyers and sellers. They may have ready resources, such as a long list of clientele who are ready to make purchases or people who are itching to sell businesses or properties. Vested business brokers may also be in contact with a wider network that, in turn, can put you in touch with more possible buyers and sellers.

Aside from these perks, the services of vested business brokers usually include some form of promotion, like advertisements and publicity, which can speed up the sale or purchase of your item.

Business deals, such as the buying and selling of a business or property, usually includes a fair amount of paper work and can take up a lot of your time. If you do not want to be bothered by the technical details, then you can hire a professional to address your needs. Vested business brokers can take care of everything from setting up meetings, making credit inquiries and even doing your paperwork. With these people at the helm, all you need to worry about is getting a fair deal.

The buying and selling process can be complicated. Many of the business dealings involving buying and selling can be taxing. That is why you need someone reliable who will take care of your assets and your money. You want someone who is smart enough to know a good deal when he stumbles upon one and turns away from a bad deal as soon as the warning signs flash.

Here is What Life is Really Like For Small Business Brokers

Among the most intriguing career choices for business people is to become small business brokers. Many people who have burned out or retired from a corporate or even a small business position are attracted to this field because of its many benefits.

But does the reality match the myths about this work? Here’s a frank look into some of the popular claims about the profession.

1. Make a six figure income your first year.

Actually that’s true. Of course the six figures include all the numbers on both sides of the decimal point.

Sure there are small business brokers making $100k plus. Most likely they’ve been at it awhile. They have proven to the genie who sits on the bag with all the gold that they’re worthy of abundant rewards for mastering the many trials put in their way. Those include, for example, the “clients” who can’t or won’t perform as promised, and the trolls who climb out from under the bridge so they can kill deals.

2. Have complete control over the way you spend your time.

What a privilege to be able to call your day your own, with no one to tell you what to do. Unfortunately it’s not the full day, just those few hours between the 11:00 o’clock nightly news and the rooster’s announcement at dawn.

Guess when that “can’t miss” session with the landlord is going to happen – the very day you had planned to start the vacation trip you’ve long promised your family.

Prospective small business brokers eagerly anticipating the chance to get out on the golf course in the middle of the day don’t know about the owners who will require hours-long meetings about their possible interest in selling out. And there are buyers who somehow get in the mood to make offers only during those holiday weekends when everyone else is at home greeting relatives and firing up the barbecue.

3. The opportunity of working with smart and successful associates.

This is very appealing to the would-be business broker who’s spent years in the workforce dealing with dumbbells and with co-workers so slow that a sloth looks ambitious by comparison.

There are bright, energetic and professional small business brokers who get things done. But don’t expect them to want to do those things with you. And you may be justified in complaining that they’re greedy and rude.

Then, when you’ve been in the business for a while, have some good listings, motivated and qualified buyers and a solid reputation, you’ll be accused of the same things. You may switch from the “for” side to the “against” side of the “cooperation” debate the first time you find out your seller’s confidential information is circulating on twitter, and discover the other broker’s buyer doesn’t understand the meaning of the confidentiality agreement. Or when you get a letter from an attorney asking you to reimburse a buyer or seller for their losses – losses caused by misrepresentations and promises that came from the other broker you agreed to work with.

4. The chance to do meaningful work that really helps people.

There will be times when a seller or buyer will actually say “thank you.” And you’ll feel good about having given the client smart advice and negotiating well on his or her behalf.

Just hope there are enough of those satisfying moments to balance out the frustrations and disappointments caused by those who stand you up, lie to you, change their minds and kill your deals.

So, while there are substantial joys and benefits for those working as small business brokers, it takes guts, determination and perseverance to make the career really yield those rewards. And it’s a good idea, when starting out on this adventure, to have a year’s living expenses in the bank.

Selling a Small Business – Why Selling a Smaller Business is Different

If you are a business owner thinking of selling a small business, the process is somewhat different than selling a much larger, more involved company.

Smaller businesses are bought by investors for different reasons and, depending on the size of the company, attract completely different buyer profiles. This article looks at some of the differences in selling a small business from the owner’s point of view.

Micro-Businesses
What is meant by “micro businesses” are businesses that are valued at less than $100,000. There are many different types of micro-businesses and each can attract a different buyer profile. For instance, if you own a small, home-based business valued at $75,000 or so, this usually attracts a potential buyer that is completely different than the person looking for a business valued up to $250,000. To expand, businesses valued under $100,000 or so usually fall into a number of categories. They can be home-based businesses where a good buyer candidate can be a stay-at-home parent looking to augment an income. At this lower price range the business may also be a service based business such as landscaping or home inspection, as an example. This type of business is attractive to the “do it yourselfer” who is purely looking to ‘buy a job’ and a book of existing accounts. The $100,000 and under price range might also reflect a business that could be larger but has suffered a setback and has the potential for stronger earnings going forward, with right management in place. Micro businesses do not necessarily mean ‘micro earnings’. Many smaller companies have excellent income potential and could make a great investment for the right buyer. The point is, when you are selling a small business (especially a micro business) please don’t merely characterize the type of potential buyer based on price. Smaller businesses are attractive to many people for many different reasons.

Small businesses valued in the $300,000 price range
The price point of $300,000 is a ‘sweet spot’ for selling a business in that it is a price that is ‘doable’ by a relatively large pool of buyers. Businesses valued at approximately $300,000 (typically) earn an income to an owner/operator that is over $100,000. This size of business is attractive in that it allows an owner to operate it and pay off debt and earn a comfortable living off of the business income. That price range is within reach for many people, especially home owners who can finance a portion of the business purchase with home equity. If you own a small business in the $300,000 range and if your business is profitable, priced right, stable and showing consistent returns, there should be a relatively large pool of buyers for your business.

Small businesses valued up to $750,000
If you own a business valued in the neighbourhood of $750,000 this is still characterized as a “small business” but it would attract a completely different type of buyer (or investor) to your company. Selling a small business in this higher price range usually attracts a buyer with more financial resources or perhaps a partnership or group of buyers. Many times, the idea with buying a business at this price range is that it can earn enough income to justify hiring a manager with enough cashflow left over to pay the debt and earn a return for the buyers.

If you are thinking of selling a small business think about the type of buyer that would be ‘ideal’ to purchase your company. Think in terms of price and financial ability but also pay attention to things like aptitude and lifestyle choice. There are many small business resources on the internet to answer some of your questions. Talk to a business broker to help you sell a smaller business.